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Do HMOs Make a Difference?

Consumer Assessments of Health Care

Winter 1999/2000
Inquiry, vol.36, no.4 (Winter 1999/2000): 411-418
Timothy K. Lake

Abstract:

his study examines the effects of health maintenance organizations (HMOs) on consumer assessments of health care among the privately insure, nonelderly population. After controlling for population and location differences, the study finds that HMO enrollees are less likely than those in non-HMOs to be satisfied with their care, to rate their last medical visit highly, and to express trust in their physicians. One exception is a finding of little or no statistically significant difference between HMO and non-HMO enrollees in the likelihood of distrust that a physician may provide unnecessary services.

For a full copy please visit Inquiry


Printable Version

 
 

Satisfaction and Quality:

Fall 1997
Data Bulletin No. 03
 
 

Do HMOs Make a Difference?

Winter 1999/2000
Inquiry
 
 

Do HMOs Make a Difference?

Winter 1999/2000
Inquiry
 
 

Do HMOs Make a Difference?

Winter 1999/2000
Inquiry
 
 

Do HMOs Make a Difference?

Winter 1999/2000
Inquiry
 
 

Do HMOs Make a Difference?

Winter 1999/2000
Inquiry
 
     



 
 

Do HMOs Make a Difference?

Comparing Access, Service Use and Satisfaction Between Consumers in HMOs and Non-HMOs
 
     



 
 

Timothy K. Lake

 
     




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