Center for Studying Health System Change

Providing Insights that Contribute to Better Health Policy

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Health System Change in Syracuse, New York

July 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Lansing, Michigan

August 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Phoenix, Arizona

September 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Boston, Massachusetts

June 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Cleveland, Ohio

May 1997
Case Study
 
 

Do HMOs Make a Difference?

Winter 1999/2000
Inquiry
 
 

Association Leaders Speak Out on Health System Change

January/February 1997
Health Affairs
 
 

Snapshots of Change in Fifteen Communities:

Summer 1996
Health Affairs
 
 

Snapshots of Change in Fifteen Communities:

Summer 1996
Health Affairs
 
 

Snapshots of Change in Fifteen Communities:

Summer 1996
Health Affairs
 
 

Snapshots of Change in Fifteen Communities:

Summer 1996
Health Affairs
 
 

Health System Change in Little Rock, Arkansas

July 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Miami, Florida

June 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Newark, New Jersey

September 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Orange County, California

September 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Twelve Communities

September 1997
Compilation of 1996-97 Site Visits
 
 

Health System Change in Indianapolis, Indiana

September 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Greenville, South Carolina

September 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Seattle, Washington

August 1997
Case Study
 
 

Collaboration and Competition Coexist

Fall 1998
Community Report No. 01
 
     

Monitoring Market Change: Findings from the Community Tracking Study:

The Community Tracking Study Analyses of Market Change: Introduction

April 2000
Health Services Research, vol.35, no.1, Part 1 (April 2000): 7-16
Paul B. Ginsburg, Peter Kemper, Raymond J. Baxter, Linda T. Kohn

his essay introduces and describes the research methodology common to two articles that report on a systematic study of health system change based on site visits to a national cross-section of U.S. cities. As part of the Community Tracking Study, researchers visited 12 metropolitan statistical areas with populations over 200,000 and conducted from 36 to 60 in-person interviews with leaders of organizations involved in the financing and delivery of health care. The interviews were conducted in 1996 and 1997. Interview modules were designed to obtain multiple perspectives on a question, and the communities were compared to identify common patterns of change and differences across communities. Researchers found that fundamental changes in the way care is actually delivered is likely to lag behind the extensive changes in organizational relationships that are taking place.

For a full copy please visit Health Services Research.

 

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