Center for Studying Health System Change

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Insurance Coverage & Costs Access to Care Uninsured and Low-Income Racial/Ethnic Disparities Safety Net Providers Community Health Centers Hospitals Physicians Insured People Quality & Care Delivery Health Care Markets Issue Briefs Data Bulletins Research Briefs Policy Analyses Community Reports Journal Articles Other Publications Surveys Site Visits Design and Methods Data Files


 
 

Joy M. Grossman

 
     
 
 

Health System Change in Boston, Massachusetts

June 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Cleveland, Ohio

May 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Phoenix, Arizona

September 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Twelve Communities

September 1997
Compilation of 1996-97 Site Visits
 
 

Collaboration and Competition Coexist

Fall 1998
Community Report No. 01
 
 

Do HMOs Make a Difference?

Winter 1999/2000
Inquiry
 
 

Association Leaders Speak Out on Health System Change

January/February 1997
Health Affairs
 
 

Snapshots of Change in Fifteen Communities:

Summer 1996
Health Affairs
 
 

Snapshots of Change in Fifteen Communities:

Summer 1996
Health Affairs
 
 

Snapshots of Change in Fifteen Communities:

Summer 1996
Health Affairs
 
 

Health System Change in Syracuse, New York

July 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health Plans 2010:

September/October 1998
Today's Internist
 
 

Health System Change in Lansing, Michigan

August 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Orange County, California

September 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Seattle, Washington

August 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Little Rock, Arkansas

July 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Miami, Florida

June 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Newark, New Jersey

September 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Greenville, South Carolina

September 1997
Case Study
 
 

Health System Change in Indianapolis, Indiana

September 1997
Case Study
 
     

Monitoring Market Change: Findings from the Community Tracking Study:

Health Plan Competition in Local Markets

April 2000
Health Services Research, vol.35, no.1, Part 1 (April 2000): 17-36
Joy M. Grossman

lthough the competitive threat from national plans is pervasive in 12 communities studied as part of the Community Tracking Study, local plans in most sites continue to retain strong, often dominant, positions in historically concentrated markets. The author found three strategies to increase market share and market power were used in all sites in response to purchaser pressures for stable premiums and provider choice and the threat of entry and to plans: (1) consolidation/geographic expansion; (2) price competition; and (3) product line/segment diversification that focuses on broad networks and open-access products. In most markets, in response to the demand for provider choice, the trend is away from ownership and exclusive arrangements with providers. Although local plans are moving to become full-service regional players, this is uncertainty about the abilities of all plans to sustain growth strategies at the expense of margins and organizational stability, and to effectively manage care with broad networks.

For a full copy please visit Health Services Research.

 

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