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Community Approaches to Providing Care for the Uninsured

April 11, 2006
Health Affairs, Web Exclusive
Erin Fries Taylor, Peter J. Cunningham, Kelly L. McKenzie

Faced with rising uninsurance rates and little response at the state or federal levels in recent years, communities have developed various strategies to provide care for uninsured people. This paper profiles local strategies in the Community Tracking Study sites, focusing on efforts that go beyond traditional safety-net access. The findings suggest that more-recent community efforts—which tend to be privately sponsored—are relatively modest in scope compared with more-mature programs that enjoy public financing. Although local strategies can fill some holes, communities often do not have the resources necessary to fully address the problems of the uninsured on their own.

This article is available at the Health Affairs Web site by clicking here. (Free access.)


 

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